Curry Dill Tilapia Filets

Tonight’s dinner was a really quick and easy preparation of tilapia and asparagus.  It was a long day and we just wanted something thrown together that would be as hands-off as possible.  This is what we came up with:

  • 4 tilapia filets 
  • 1/2 tsp curry powder
  • 2 tbsp ghee
  • 1 tsp fresh torn dill
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
How to:
  • Pre-heat oven to 350ºF
  • Melt ghee in a small bowl and add in curry, dill, and garlic powder.
  • Place tilapia on stick-free baking sheet.
  • Paint tilapia with ghee mixture.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes, until it easily flakes with a fork.
All you need for the asparagus is to blanch it in boiling water for 3-4 minutes and then transfer to cold water.  We had dinner made in about 30 minutes total and might even have some leftovers for tomorrow.  Just watch out for bones; we only found a few, but it could have been bad if we weren’t expecting it.

Naturally Fermented Spicy Dill Pickles

Taking a point from Mark over at Mark’s Daily Apple, I decided to try my hand at making my own naturally fermented pickles.  I tried the recipe he mentioned but then also tried to take my own spin on it.  Here’s my recipe:

  • 1 1/2 cups filtered water
  • 2 tbsp kosher salt
  • 2 crushed cloves of garlic
  • 1 tsp peppercorns
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 2 halved jalapeño stuffed olives (Santa Barbara Olive Company)
  • 5 small cucumbers (ends cut)
  • 5 sprigs of dill
I added in the garlic, peppercorns, red pepper flakes, jalapeño stuffed olives, and dill into the jar.  Then I added in the pickles and salt water.  Definitely put at least halved pieces of the cucumber above the whole cucumbers you put in, as it keeps them all submerged in the brine.
After 5 days, the brine got quite cloudy, so I decided to finally give them a shot.  The standard recipe actually seemed to spoil or something–they were violently salty and not so exciting.  My spin was nice and spicy without being too extreme.  Also, it still had a great crunch.  They’ll only keep for a week at most, so I look forward to eating them pretty constantly for the next few days.  

Pot Roast

We were able to pick up some pot roast on sale last week, and as the week flew by, the window for using or freezing the roast was closing in.  Instead of freezing it, I decided to put together an easy overnight pot roast.

  • 2-3 lb pot roast
  • 2 carrots, coarsely chopped
  • 1 small onion, quartered
  • 4 tbsp chicken gelatin/fat (leftover from baked thighs)
  • 1 tbsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tbsp garlic salt
  • 1 tsp fresh rosemary
I started with sprinkling the garlic salt and paprika on both sides of the pot roast.  Then I added the chopped onion, carrot, and rosemary into the bottom of the crock pot.  Then I added the chicken fat/gelatin from the thighs I cooked earlier in the week.  This is a great way to make some chicken stock without having to buy anything else–my first attempt and a successful one!
I then added in the pot roast, and filled up the crock pot with water until the meat was submerged.  Then set the dial to low, and let it cook overnight for about 9 hours.
At that point, the pot roast easily shredded, and then went right back into the stock.  You could easily use the meat shredded with flavors of your choice, or use it as a stew.  Admittedly the stock is a little bland, but as we’re adjusting to the new diet, I think it fit the bill pretty well.

Chicken Salad

Here’s my attempt at Haley’s Homemade Chicken Salad from the Food Lovers’ Primal Palate (recipe here).  This is one of my favorite recipes, and I thoroughly recommend it. My one cautionary tale: 

When making homemade mayonnaise, your choice of oil makes all the difference.  I can’t find/afford a cup of macadamia oil, so I usually use 3/4 cup of coconut oil and 1/4 cup walnut oil.  Unfortunately I ran out of those things and had to make up the difference with olive oil.  DO NOT do that.  The flavor isn’t miserable, but it does leave something to be desired.  

Easy Sage Tea

I worked from home the past few days because I haven’t been feeling well–this Whole30 thing has really sent my body’s internal organs on a crazy ride. Hopefully, everything settles down soon; for now, I’m doing my best to tough it out.

I would never have thought to make my own tea, nevermind sage tea. But today, a friend suggested it for my upset tummy and I remembered that we had fresh sage in the fridge. So I did a quick Google search for “how to make sage tea” and tada! an easy recipe was at hand.

I didn’t actually follow the recipe. That would be too easy! :-p Instead, I just tore up enough sage leaves to fit into my tea strainer, heated some water, and let it steep. The recipe lists lemon and honey as optional additions. Honey is obviously not a Whole30 menu item, and I wanted to experience the flavor (and hopefully the helpful effects) of this tea in its original form so I didn’t add the lemon either.

 

The tea is light in color. It’s soothing on my throat and the warmth feels nice in my tummy. The soft sage flavor is just right. I suppose too much sage would make this tea rather bitter. But I got lucky–apparently my tea strainer holds just the right amount of torn sage leaves. 🙂

%d bloggers like this: