Tag Archives: 21dsd

Pork Chop Suey

Chop Suey has been popularized in America through Americanized Chinese restaurants, although it has a history in Asia and the South Pacific as well. What I hadn’t realized is that Chop Suey roughly translates to “assorted pieces” (thanks, Wikipedia!). I’m always excited to find different cultural versions of “kitchen sink”-style meals. In the spirit of assorted pieces, I learned all of this and prepared this recipe when confronted with uncooked boneless pork ribs that had to be cooked or frozen—we didn’t even have to make a trip to the grocery store to put this together, in true Chop Suey fashion.

I enjoy the spirit of making something with what you have on hand. It’s not as intimidating as an episode of Chopped, but it’s empowering to know that even when a meal isn’t already prepared, you have the tools to make one in your refrigerator. I am sure you’re going to enjoy this recipe.

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Solyanka

We have had some pretty cold and dreary weather lately, and this kind of weather always causes me to crave soup. This weekend, Brent was eager to experiment with something new. Brent discovered Solyanka, a spicy and sour soup that originates from Russia but is also popular in Germany and former Eastern Block countries.

Solyanka is traditionally prepared in three different varieties: meat, fish, or mushroom. When Brent shared our recipe development with our friend Russ, who you might know as The Domestic Man, his first question was “Meat, fish, or mushroom?” As someone who specializes in recreating traditional recipes, it was no surprise to us that he was already familiar.

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Tex-Mex Breakfast Bake

For the start of 2017, I’m trying something that I normally despise—eating breakfast. Most mornings, I don’t find myself particularly hungry and I get by with a cup of black coffee and wait until lunch. That said, it’s always been a hunger decision rather than a dislike of breakfast foods. You can see from our multiple breakfast recipes that we’re pretty keen on breakfast foods (although Heather is a much bigger fan of pancakes and waffles).

This recipe hits a number of must-haves for me: you can make it in one pot, it makes multiple servings, and you can make it spicy. This skillet dish reminds me a bit of chili, but the addition of cauliflower and the final step of baking the dish brings the texture closer to a breakfast casserole. And if you’re like me, and like things spicy, you can cover it in hot sauce with no regrets.

Without further ado, I hope you’ll enjoy this recipe for our tex-mex style breakfast bake.

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Easy Overnight Refrigerator Pickles

Pickles—just thinking about them makes my mouth water. They’re easily one of my favorite snacks, and I’ve been known to sit down on the couch with one of the gigantic jars you can buy at Costco and put a serious dent in the supply. We’ve also come to love local pickles as well as craft pickles. Brooklyn Brine makes some amazing flavor combinations, especially spicy ones, that we love, but our wallets do not (plus, they’re not quite gluten-free).

Making pickles with a traditional brine is fun, and like craft cider or wine in a lot of ways (fermentation), but it is definitely not an immediate reward. When we made our own pickles back in 2012 based on another recipe, we waited a good 5 days before trying them and had mixed results. We also did something similar with Brussels sprouts a little while back. Even with this recipe, it took the better part of a week.

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Green Bean Casserole

Green bean casserole is a holiday tradition. When we went paleo, it fell off the list for a couple of reasons. It wasn’t the main attraction on our table growing up, nor was Heather jumping to figure out how to recreate it without all of the pre-made, preservative-laden ingredients (I’m looking at you condensed soup). This year, however, I wanted to make it happen. Using a homemade cream soup as a base, we crafted a paleo green bean casserole.

One thing to note is that we made our cream of celery soup with homemade pork stock—it was what we had in the refrigerator. Its savory, gelatinous consistency took everything to a new level. If you are looking for a go-to resource for making stock at home, this guide from Real Everything is the answer.

The one thing we didn’t add to the mix was the French’s Crispy Fried Onions. These aren’t a must-have for us, but if you’d really like to give them a try, we made fried onions for our Western Meatloaf. An extra step, but if you’ve got to have them, go for it! Just add them to the top of the casserole for the final 10 minutes of baking.

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