seafood

Chicken & Shrimp Paella

Last week, a coworker of mine got a gigantic paella pan for Christmas from his mother-in-law.  This event reminded me of how delicious paella is, and how I’ve never actually attempted to make it.  It was a great time for us to finally venture out to the local international market, as well.  We were able to find everything we needed there, and all for much less than what we typically pay at the local grocer. Continue reading

Crab Cakes with Old Bay Horseradish Mayonnaise

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Welcome to our new internet home!  We thought this crab cake recipe would be a great way to kick off the new site, as it’s a delicious and easy dish that will win hearts and stomachs.  We do make our own mayonnaise, and for this recipe, our mayonnaise consisted of: 1 egg, 1/4 tsp black pepper, 1/4 tsp mustard, 1/2 C coconut oil, 1/2 C olive oil.  Even though we do that, you should be alright with the clean mayonnaise of your choosing–just try and stay away from the canola or corn oil supermarket mayonnaises.

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Bacon & Caper Topped Scallops

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After spending the day with The Domestic Man a couple of weeks ago, he inspired me with his talk of seared scallops.  With a photo result and the idea of delicious scallops and bacon in my mind, I went to town on a version of my own.  We had purchased capers for another recipe, and I have always loved how they paired with salmon and salads.

Langostino Bisque

This recipe came about as we were trying to figure out what type of seafood we would have for the week.  Typically we will get our seafood from Costco, but this time their salmon was less than desirable, and most of the other seafood was either ridiculously expensive or farmed.  The only wild caught option we could find was langostino.  After enlisting Siri, we found out what a langostino is.  The “squat lobster”, as it is nicknamed, really does look a bit like a tiny lobster.  After cooking with it, I would say that it meets the requirement for a lobster-like taste and consistency (not as buttery) for a fraction of the cost.  Some food purists don’t like how the langostino is used as a lobster impostor in some fast food campaigns, e.g. lobster bites, but there were no smoke and mirrors here.

Pan Seared Creole Tilapia

We’ve been making a lot of recipes from the 21 DSD program and our favorite Paleo sites lately (PaleOMG, Primal Palate, Mark’s Daily Apple, etc.). So, tonight for dinner, I wanted to be a little creative. Ok, maybe creole tilapia isn’t all that creative… but at least it isn’t something we’ve found on any other specifically Paleo website, so there!

The best part is, this recipe is really quick and easy.

Ingredients

  • 2-4 Tilapia fillets
  • 1 Tablespoon coconut oil (or extra virgin olive oil)
  • 1/2 Tablespoon onion powder
  • 1/2 Tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 Tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 Tablespoon dried basil
  • 3/4 teaspoon thyme
  • 3/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3/4 teaspoon white pepper (If you don’t have white pepper, you can just double up on the black pepper; personally, I can’t taste the difference.)
  • 3/4 teaspoon cayenne
  • 5 teaspoons paprika
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • lemon wedges (optional, for garnish)
Method
  1. Blend all the spices together in a small bowl.
  2. Dredge the tilapia fillets in the spices. Make sure both sides of each fillet are fully covered in the spice rub.
  3. Heat the oil over medium-high flame.
  4. Cook each fillet for 2-3 minutes per side. (If your fillets happen to be thicker than 3/4 of an inch, you may need to let them cook longer per side.)
As you can see, I paired my creole tilapia with roasted sweet potato and asparagus because that’s what we had in the house that needed to be used. However, I think sautéed kale would have been better than asparagus. You could also serve this over cauliflower “rice” instead of with sweet potatoes.
Did I mention this was delicious? I love, love, love a good cajun or creole dish (yes, they are different, if only slightly). One of these days, I’m going to try making dirty rice from scratch… and make it paleo-friendly, of course. Anyways, until I get around to figuring that out, I hope you find this quick and easy tilapia recipe a good way to get your Louisiana fix. 😉
For the heat seekers: To get a really good bite, use 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon more of the cayenne, garlic and pepper.
P.S. This recipe is Paleo, Whole30 and 12 DSD friendly. Enjoy!

Salmon Loaf

A few weeks ago we made these awesome Basil Salmon Burgers from Loren Cordain’s The Paleo Diet Cookbook, but we had so much basil-salmon mix that we chose to freeze some of it for a later date.

 
This weekend, I was feeling a bit creative and realized we could use the mix to make a salmon loaf. Why not, right? Toss in a little almond flour, some egg… shouldn’t be too hard.
I was so proud of myself–I thought I was being really quite clever and unique. Only later I called my mom to tell her about it, and she said “Oh! I have a great salmon loaf recipe from Grandma.” It deflated my spirits a tiny bit, but no matter. I was still excited to try it.
 
It really was quite easy!
 
I mixed together approx. 3 cups of the basil-salmon mixture, 1 egg and 1/4 cup of almond flour.
 

Then Brent suggested topping it with some of the shredded white sweet potato we had left over from other recipes, for the sake of texture.

 

I baked it at 350 for about 40 minutes.

 

It came out beautifully. It was not quite as salty as the basil-salmon burgers, and the crunch from the shredded sweet potato was really a nice touch.
 

Oh, and I forgot to mention: we didn’t bother greesing the pan. Salmon is such a fatty fish; if you’re starting with a salmon filet like we did (instead of from the can like my grandmother used to do), there should be plenty of natural oils to keep it from sticking.

Happy cooking!

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